Construction

Dig This: District Breaks Ground on Hike and Bike Trail

Dig This: District Breaks Ground on Hike and Bike Trail

A Scoop of a Story: Dishing the dirt are (from left): Jim Murphy, Westchase District; Lucio Ortiz, Texas Department of Transportation; Gwen Tillotson, City of Houston; Sandra Musgrove, Harris County Flood Control District; and Philip Schneidau, Westchase District Board of Directors.   City, county and state officials joined Westchase District for a groundbreaking ceremony recently marking the construction start of the Brays Bayou Connector Trail (BBCT). [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="300"] Steve Le, City Council Member District F, speaks at the District's groundbreaking for the Brays Bayou Connector Trail.[/caption] The new 1.92-mile trail will run south from Richmond Avenue to Bellaire Boulevard and will feature underpasses at Richmond, Westpark Drive, Westpark Tollway, Harwin Drive and Bellaire, allowing users to enjoy the trail entirely off-street. The BBCT will also connect to the City of Houston's on-street bikeway network via street connectors at each roadway intersection. "This is the first project under construction using funds from our 380 Area Agreement," said Jim Murphy, Westchase District's general manager, referring to an agreement between Westchase District and the City of Houston which provides money from property tax revenue increases to finance public infrastructure projects. "It represents the start of many more exciting projects already in cue that will improve the quality of life for Westchase District residents, workers and visitors." Construction of the BBCT will cost about $4 million and will be funded with a grant from the Federal Transit Agency and money from the 380 Area Agreement. Expected completion of the BBCT is Fall 2016.

Dig It: District Grows Trail Network

Dig It: District Grows Trail Network

In emerging subdivisions or master-planned communities, it’s relatively easy to develop a park or design a winding trail for residents. In an area with precious little undeveloped land such as Westchase District, shoehorning in outdoor amenities among existing structures can prove a challenge. However, by the end of this year Westchase District will feature nearly four miles of off-street trails for joggers, walkers and bicyclists. This spring Westchase District broke ground on Brays Bayou Connector Trail (BBCT), a new 1.92-mile off-street trail that will run south from Richmond Avenue to Bellaire Boulevard. The 8-to 10-foot concrete path will include benches, water fountains, trash receptacles, landscaping, wildflowers, tree groves and a four-piece workout station.

Building Connections
The most exciting thing about the trail is its connectivity to a larger system, according to Irma Sanchez, vice of projects for Westchase District. “This trail will connect to the City of Houston’s on-street bikeway network at each roadway intersection and to the Westchase Park & Ride on Harwin,” said Sanchez. The direct trail connection to this METRO facility will enable trail users access to METRO’s bus route 151 (Westpark Express), which travels to downtown. Across the street from the park and ride, BBCT will connect to the 8-acre, city-owned Harwin Park and the 81-acre, county-owned Arthur Storey Park, as well as the future Brays Bayou Trail. On the north end, the BBCT will connect at Richmond to the District’s existing Library Loop Trail., which loops east and west between the Robinson – Westchase Neighborhood Library, 3223 Wilcrest Drive, and the Deborah Sue Schatz United States Post Office, 2909 Rogerdale Road.
Underpass access
The new trail will feature underpasses at Richmond, Westpark Drive, Westpark Tollway, Harwin Drive and Bellaire Boulevard, allowing trail users to safely enjoy the trail entirely off-street. “We’re lowering the existing corrugated steel storm outlets and encasing them in square concrete box culverts to create the street underpasses,” said Irma Sanchez, vice president of projects for Westchase District. “This way they become a seamless part of the trail and users can travel right over the tops of them.” Sanchez estimates this portion of the project will run about $648,000. Construction of the BBCT will cost about $4 million and is being funded with a grant from the Federal Transit Agency and dollars from the 380 Area Agreement between Westchase District and the City of Houston, which provides money from property tax revenue increases to finance public infrastructure projects. “This project is an amazing opportunity to partner with the District,” said Gwen Tillotson, deputy director of economic development for the City of Houston. “Westchase is phenomenal at leveraging money from various sources to achieve their desired projects. This trail is a great example of that.”
Partnerships Net Progress
Another significant trail partner is the Harris County Flood Control District, which had to approve all the plans for the trail. “Our first mission is storm water drainage,” said Sandra Musgrove, HCFCD infrastructure division director. “Properly designed trails support that mission, while adding visibility and enhanced security along our bayous.” Still more trail partners exist in the form of landowners who gave the District recreational easements to build on their property, which is immediately adjacent to the canals. “Our congregation saw it as an opportunity to be of service to the District,” said Dr. Ed Montgomery, founder and pastor of Abundant Life Cathedral, whose property touches BBCT north of Harwin. “The trail is a way to promote healthy living and family interactions and I feel it will help to change the environment of our community.” The trail construction should be complete this fall.  “We’ve had some rain delays, but overall construction is good so far,” said Enrique Allende, project engineer with Miranda Construction, the contractor responsible for building BBCT. “The biggest challenge is working in tight spaces along the channel. Fitting our equipment in and having to work is tricky, but the property owners whose land backs up to the trail have been great about accommodating us.”
Power Walk
Another owner working with Westchase District is CenterPoint Energy, which allowed the District to maximize the wide swath of greenspace along the transmission corridor running north and south between Westheimer to Richmond. Through an agreement with CenterPoint, the District will begin construction soon on a trail that will connect to the Houston Community College campus at Westheimer and Hayes Road, with a mid-block crossing at Meadowglen Lane. The trail is an example of a larger effort between CenterPoint and the City of Houston to enhance the use of some 500 miles of transmission corridors crisscrossing the city. “While the trail itself is pretty basic, we’re looking at adding landscaping and benches to some open spaces just off the trail,” said Sanchez. “It will be yet another outdoor amenity that will help enlarge our trail network and enhance walkability in Westchase District.” She added that the trail will cost about $600,000, is paid for with funds from the 380 Area Agreement and a federal grant, and should be completed by the end of the year.

Phillips 66 offers sneak peak into new HQ

Phillips 66 offers sneak peak into new HQ

Phillips 66 celebrated the grand opening of its new world headquarters with a ribbon cutting ceremony led by Chairman & CEO Greg Garland.

By the Numbers
The 1.1 million-square-foot building has two towers connected by a sky bridge. In addition to traditional office space, the buildings have 275 conference rooms and other collaborative working space. A total of 2,200 employees will be moving to the new cutting-edge facility. They will have access to 2700 parking spaces, two courtyards, a putting green, soccer field, sport court and running track. Other amenities include a cafeteria, coffee shop, two credit unions, wellness center and medical and dental offices. The company broke ground for the towers in December 2013 and employees will move-in during July. More coverage is available at the Houston Business Journal [caption id="attachment_5650" align="alignnone" width="598"] Phillips 66 Chairman and CEO Greg Garland[/caption] [caption id="attachment_5651" align="alignnone" width="603"] The Phillips 66 campus is located at 2331 CityWest Boulevard, immediately west of Beltway 8 and north of Westheimer.[/caption]

Looking Good: New Mastarms and Landscaping

Looking Good: New Mastarms and Landscaping

Two new projects are underway in Westchase District which have things looking spiffy. First up: at the request of the District, the City of Houston is upgrading the traffic signal at the intersection of Briarpark and Westpark, replacing the traditional span-wires with the cleaner and safer mastarm signal poles.   [caption id="attachment_5635" align="aligncenter" width="671"] Beltway 8, North of Bellaire[/caption] Next, the Texas Department of Transportation is landscaping the greenspace along southbound Beltway 8, just north of Bellaire. TxDOT funded 100 percent of the construction costs and used designs provided by Westchase District. When completed, the District will take over maintenance of the area after one year.    

Twice as Nice: Apartments Open Phase 2

Twice as Nice: Apartments Open Phase 2

Old World Style, New World Luxury: Clockwise from top left: One-bedroom study units are spacious and modern; Portico at West 8 features a mix of Spanish, Mediterranean and Texan architecture; the new community room offers residents a place to lounge; a swimming pool is at the center of this enclosed courtyard with barrel tile roofs and stucco siding.


In Italy, the word “portico” simply means “porch” – but in Westchase District, the word is associated with luxury multifamily living. Since 2008, Portico at West 8, located at 3003 Seagler Road, has treated its residents to an eclectic mix of Spanish-Mediterranean-Texan architecture and Class A amenities. Recently the community more than doubled in size, adding 296 units to its existing 230. The expansion of the four-story, mid-rise community is the fruition of a master plan years in the making.
Extended drumroll
The community’s owner, Richfield Real Estate Corporation, always intended for there to be two phases to the project, even building a shared parking lot with 2,300 spaces. Following the financial crisis of 2009, the second phase of Portico temporarily was put on hold. “For a while, we had what was arguably the most spacious parking garage in Houston,” said Daniel Calderon, community manager. In 2013, Richfield broke ground on Portico’s second phase, adding an additional 296 units to its existing 230 at an unhurried pace. “For the staff, it felt like an extended drumroll as we anticipated the Phase 2 opening,” Calderon said. “Now that we’re finally here, we’re excited to fill up the new units.”
A twist of the old and new
Portico at West 8 features such architectural elements as articulated roof lines, wrought iron railings and arched entryways. “Each building is constructed in curved street patterns to reinforce a pedestrian-friendly atmosphere,” said Calderon. “It’s all meant to feel more like an old world neighborhood.” That old-world charm is balanced by modern touches in Phase 2’s design. “There’s LED lighting, granite countertops, wood flooring, two-tone paint schemes and ceramic tile backsplashes,” Calderon said. “The two-bedroom units now have garden tubs in both bathrooms, the one-bedroom studies are more spacious and we’ve redesigned the washers and dryers to be in the bathrooms rather than in the hallways.”
Amenities for residents and guests
A new community room – available for parties and meetings – complements the leasing office lounge, where the staff hosts monthly brunches, movie nights, and arts and crafts sessions. Residents also have access to Starbucks coffee and a juice bar all day long. “Also, we offer a limited number of guest suites for short-term stays,” Calderon said. “We manage it like a hotel. It’s a great amenity for residents’ relatives and friends who are in town for holidays or a brief visit.” Calderon and his staff are currently leasing one- and two-bedroom floor plans between 870 to 1,300 square feet. For more information, call 713-781-9628 or visit porticoatwest8.com.

Game Changer: Parks and Recreation Coming Soon

Game Changer: Parks and Recreation Coming Soon

A proper home for scooters and soccer balls: This 3.4 acre-field just north of the Library Loop Trail on Wilcrest Drive will become one of two parks in Westchase District.


For all the rich amenities in Westchase District – unmatched mobility, award-winning beautifi cation, superior public safety and convenient retail shopping just to name a few – the area historically has been park poor. That’s about to change with the City of Houston’s recent vote to purchase two plots of land in Westchase District for $3.6 million to be used for city parks. One 3.4-acre parcel is on Wilcrest Drive just north of Richmond Avenue and the District’s Library Loop Trail. The other 1.8-acre parcel is on Woodchase Drive just north of the Westpark Tollway. The vote to purchase the land is the culmination of sustained efforts by the District to partner with the City of Houston to acquire public green space. “This is a huge step forward in realizing a dream of ours to have not just one, but two public parks in Westchase District,” said Jim Murphy, Westchase District’s general manager. “Once the land is secured, we’ll be spending millions in funds from our 380 Area Agreement with the city to equip these parklands with quality amenities for all to enjoy.”
“Tricked out”
The District, Murphy said, will engage in a thorough process of evaluating what the best elements are to put into the park. “We want both parks to be fi rst-class environments that are attractive and inviting,” he said. “These parks will be fully tricked out. I’m talking landscaping and lighting, ongoing security and maintenance, benches, dog park areas and walking paths that connect with other community amenities. I suspect we will see particular equipment that will cater to both the very young as well as to seniors, each of which are signifi cant populations in and around the District.” Murphy added that these are the fi rst public parks to be provided not just in Westchase District but in a much larger area around the region. “The ability to market these parks as part of our package of amenities will be enormously benefi cial to our multifamily communities as well as to our employers and offi ce properties,” he said.
Community support
Reaction from the community has been enthusiastic and positive. The Indonesian Consulate, located at 10370 Richmond Avenune, backs the District’s Library Loop Trail and will be just southwest of the park at Wilcrest. In a letter to Murphy, Henk Edward Saroinsong with the consulate wrote, “...we agree on the project because it is not only benefi cial for the community but will also make the Indonesian Consulate become more strategic and will improve its property value.” Legacy at Westchase Apartments, located at 10070 Westpark Drive, has 323 units and its residents will be a block’s walk from the future park off of Woodchase. “This will be a great feature for our families,” said Liz Romero, regional supervisor with ParaWest Management, the community’s management company. “We haven’t had any parks in the area so this is a welcome opportunity for our residents to get outside, walk their pets and enjoy some fresh air near home.” “We’re excited to learn about these parks coming to Westchase District,” said Leo Tyler, campus pastor with First Methodist Houston, located at 10570 Westpark. “Playing and learning outdoors are healthy activities that can help strengthen families and build a sense of community. That benefi ts not only our church members but other members of the public to whom we minister. Our church’s motto is ‘Your Home in the City,’ and we’re committed to the spiritual wellbeing of the community. Parks are critical to the wellbeing of a city as well and to making an area feel like home.”
Next steps
Once a design fi rm has been selected, the District will begin the planning process in earnest. “We’ll host meetings and actively solicit public input on what features the park should include,” Murphy said. “Design of the parks should take about 10 to 12 months with another year of construction, so I would expect us to open both parks in early 2019.”